Co-creation at its very best!

Co-creation at its very best!


Sample Scholarly Collaborations

 

Professional Development, EDGES -- EDGES (Education and Discovery Grounded in Engaged Scholarship) is a nationally-recognized faculty development program; it was created by Patti Clayton, Audrey Jaeger, and Jessica Jameson, with input from colleagues at NC State University and from national engagement scholars and with funding from the “Faculty for the Engaged Campus” initiative of Community-Campus Partnerships for Health (CCPH) and the Fund for the Improvement of Secondary Education (FIPSE). EDGES is a developmentally-structured, competency-based approach to supporting faculty in the design and implementation of community-engaged scholarship projects during key transition points (or “edges”) in their career paths—projects that, in turn, involve students at key transition points in their undergraduate careers. Doctoral students and faculty undertake a year-long program, in career stage cohorts, including professional development activities (both within and across stage cohorts) oriented toward the development of community-engaged scholarship projects (focused on teaching or research) to be implemented with students (in the first or last year of their undergraduate careers). EDGES creates an inter-generational learning community of novice and senior faculty, provides experiential collaborative learning opportunities for faculty and their community partners, makes explicit the connection of community-engaged scholarship to education (teaching) and discovery (research), facilitates the reflective implementation of new projects, enhances the curriculum, and deepens the field’s understanding of community-engaged scholarship across career stages.

 

Curricular Design, Nonprofit Studies Minor -- Supporting a faculty/staff/student cohort in a multi-year project to design, implement, and conduct scholarship of teaching and learning on a new minor grounded in threaded (sequential) service-learning and structured in accordance with Bloom's Taxonomy as applied to five key themes (conceptualized as leadership challenges facing the nonprofit sector): aligning mission, methods, and resources; balancing individual interests and the common good; earning the public trust; moving from charity to systemic change; and capitalizing on opportunities associated with diversity.